SEPTEMBER 21 - 24, 2017

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For media inquiries and interviews, please contact our Marketing and Sales Manager:

Hunter Styles
cell: (202) 306-5429
hunter@twptown.org

 

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Past Festivals

2017 Press Releases

Festival and International Artists Rehearse "Antony and Cleopatra" in Turkey (4-12-17)

Download this Press Release (PDF)

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:                                        
Hunter Styles, Marketing Manager
(202) 306-5429 // hunter@twptown.org

 

PROVINCETOWN TENNESSEE WILLIAMS THEATER FESTIVAL
AND INTERNATIONAL ARTISTS
REHEARSE ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA
AT BILKENT UNIVERSITY IN ANKARA, TURKEY

 

Shakespeare’s tragedy takes a global path to Provincetown
with actors Robertson Dean, Marcel Meyer, and Everett Quinton 

 

April 12, 2017 — (Provincetown, MA) With six months to go until the annual Provincetown Tennessee Williams Festival in September, Festival artists were hard at work 5,000 miles away.

During a two-week residency in March at Bilkent University in Ankara, Turkey, performers from the U.S. and South Africa rehearsed alongside Turkish undergraduate theater students and faculty on a new international staging of the 400-year-old tragedy Antony and Cleopatra.

Directed by Festival Curator David Kaplan, the show will take a prominent place in this year’s Festival, which will celebrate connections between Tennessee Williams and William Shakespeare in Provincetown from Sept. 21-24.

Kaplan plans to anchor this year’s Festival with a special, one-day-only performance of the first half of Antony and Cleopatra on Sunday, Sept. 24 at the historic Town Hall in Provincetown.

This work in progress will be presented in association with Bilkent University, which was founded in 1984 as the first private university in Turkey. Several Turkish actors from Bilkent plan to travel to Provincetown to take part in the Festival performance.

A Global Cast

“David Kaplan created an environment that was all about exploration,” says Jason Hale, Chair of the Theatre Department at Bilkent.

The residency began with two days of general Shakespeare workshops, Hale says, before shifting into rehearsals for Antony and Cleopatra. The residency also included an open rehearsal presentation in the university’s 700-seat symphony orchestra hall on March 27, in celebration of World Theatre Day.

For rehearsals with the Turkish students, Kaplan was joined by the Los Angeles-based actor Robertson Dean (who directed and performed in last year’s Kirche, Küche, Kinder) and by actor Marcel Meyer from Cape Town, South Africa, whose company Abrahamse-Meyer Productions has collaborated with the Festival for many years, most recently for last year’s productions of Desire Under the Elms and A Perfect Analysis Given By a Parrot.

Dean will play Marc Antony, while Meyer will play Octavius Caesar (Augustus). American actor and Festival favorite Jeremy Lawrence will play Lepidus. Four actors from Turkey – including two Bilkent faculty members who are stars of the Turkish National State Theatre – have been sponsored by Bilkent University to continue the work they began in Ankara, playing several roles including Sextus Pompey.

These actors will be joined onstage in Provincetown by Obie Award-winning actor Everett Quinton, who last appeared at the Festival in 2016 to direct In the Bar of a Tokyo Hotel. A longtime member of the queer-surrealist Ridiculous Theatrical Company in New York, Quinton will play “one of the Cleopatras,” says Kaplan.

This unusual casting detail – that the queen of Egypt will be played by several actors – is driven by Kaplan’s interest in “dramatizing the appropriation” of that famous figure.

“Who is Cleopatra?” says Kaplan. “It depends on whom you ask. She’s African. She’s Greek. She’s an aging boy actor. She’s a fantasy projection. She’s an exotic temptress. She’s a wise ruler. She’s Sarah Bernhardt. She’s Claudette Colbert. She’s Liz Taylor. In this production, I want to dramatize that. Who she is depends on who’s telling the story.”

Living History

Turkey proved a dramatic and relevant setting in which to rehearse a play that so strongly echoes the histories of this part of the world.

During their two-week residency, Kaplan and the artists took a day trip to Ankara’s ancient Monumentum Ancyranum to read the inscription of the “Deeds of the Divine Augustus,” carved there on behest of the first Roman emperor – a main character in Antony and Cleopatra – before his death in 14 A.D. The emperor who bested Antony and Cleopatra wrote the history; Augustus proclaims his victories, but doesn’t mention his opponents by name.

Today, Ankara – a cosmopolitan capital located near the center of the country – enjoys a reputation as a center for the performing arts, including national theater companies, the State Opera and Ballet, and the Presidential Symphony Orchestra. Bilkent University enrolls roughly 13,000 students, 90 percent of whom are native Turkish. The school’s medium of instruction is in English.

“Kaplan has brilliant insights, but he puts things in very simple terms,” Hale says. “It’s to his credit that his openness brings students in. Working with someone like David expands our students’ understandings of world directors and world theater.”

As for Kaplan and the visiting artists, Hale says, “I think their eyes were widened by a better understanding of Turkish culture. Turkey strongly embraces Western theater – like Williams, Miller, and O’Neill – and the audiences who go to see shows in this country are varied and diverse, from teenagers to intellectuals to working class people.”

Hale, an American expat living and working in Turkey for the past four years, has 25 years of experience as an actor, director, and teacher of acting in the U.S. and internationally. He took a faculty position at Bilkent after his award-winning 2011 production of The Glass Menagerie at the National Turkish State Theater toured the country for two years, and was selected to perform at the International Sabanci Theater Festival in Adana and Istanbul.

Speaking to the Gods

For September’s Festival performance at Town Hall, Kaplan explains, the audience will be seated in the balcony, while the actors perform down below. This will allow the production to play with distance.

“This is a play about who is telling the story, and to whom, and which stories we choose to believe,” Kaplan says. “The story is begun by Octavian, which means you’re first hearing about Antony and Cleopatra from someone who doesn’t like them. We have an ongoing conflict, with Antony, Octavian, Cleopatra, and many other characters, all fighting to tell the story. It gives the audience a job: whose story do they follow? The players look up to address the audience, in the same way that actors in Shakespeare’s Globe and in the Roman Colosseum looked up.”

This one-off Sunday production will feature numerous actors and performers from other Festival shows, making it an important touchstone in this year’s line-up.

Kaplan describes this production as a “tuning fork” of sorts. “It’s like the dominant key in the music of this year’s shows,” he says, “and it will show audiences what all of our programming has in common this year – based on what two great masters of the English language were able to accomplish using language and nothing else.”

For the Provincetown showing on Sept. 24 at Town Hall, Lefty Lucy will design the costumes, and Dan Jackson will design the set – a minimal space that will include only tables and chairs. As Kaplan puts it: “this is not a play about palm trees and pyramids.”

Shakespeare and Williams

This year, the Festival inquires into one simple question: what can we see in Shakespeare’s plays by looking through the lens of Tennessee Williams?

“Williams and Shakespeare both moved seamlessly, in the later years of their writing, from tragedy to farce and back again, within the same work,” Kaplan says. “This is very true in Antony and Cleopatra. It’s also a play, like much of Williams, that is encrusted with a history of misunderstandings.” The play, while intimate, centers on an urgently political story – a far cry from romances like Romeo and Juliet.

“Like our season, this play ultimately is about the reconciliation of opposites – East and West, male and female, Rome and Egypt, modernity and tradition, love and death – and how adults learn to live with that,” Kaplan says. “Romeo and Juliet die young, but adults have to learn to live with ambivalence in an unsure world. This is also what Williams is talking about in his later plays: the mix of farce and tragedy, something we live with in America today.”

This is why Kaplan’s production of Antony and Cleopatra this year will only run through the end of Act 3, Scene 2.

“At that moment in the play, the characters are in the same kind of bubble that Williams so often presents: a floating bubble of hope. When audiences watch a Williams play, they are aware that the bubble is going to fall, but they still hope that it doesn’t. Can we see this happen in a Shakespeare play, too? I think so – and we can make it funny and satisfying, too.”

About the Provincetown Tennessee Williams Theater Festival:

The Provincetown Tennessee Williams Theater Festival was founded in 2006 in Provincetown — the birthplace of modern American theater — where Williams worked on many of his major plays during the 1940s. The TW Festival is the nation’s largest performing arts festival dedicated to celebrating and expanding an understanding of the full breadth of the work of America’s great playwright. Each year, theater artists from around the globe perform classic and innovative productions to celebrate Williams’ enduring influence in the 21st century, hosted by venues throughout the seaside village. For more details, visit twptown.org and follow the Festival on Facebook.

This Festival is funded in part by the Provincetown Tourism Fund, and is presented by Sage Inn & Lounge.

TW Festival and Texas Tech Present "The Gnädiges Fräulein" (3-21-17)

Download this Press Release (PDF)

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:                                        
Hunter Styles, Marketing Manager
(202) 306-5429 // hunter@twptown.org

 

PROVINCETOWN TENNESSEE WILLIAMS THEATER FESTIVAL
AND TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY
PRESENT THE GNÄDIGES FRÄULEIN

 

March 21, 2017 — (Provincetown, MA) The Provincetown Tennessee Williams Theater Festival and the Department of Theatre and Dance at Texas Tech University (TTU) are pleased to announce a co-production of the Tennessee Williams play The Gnädiges Fräulein as part of the 12th-annual Festival this September.

The new production, directed by Festival Executive Director Jef Hall-Flavin, will be presented at The Provincetown Theater at 238 Bradford Street in Provincetown. This year’s Festival, to be held in Provincetown Sept. 21-24, will celebrate connections between Tennessee Williams and William Shakespeare

Festival Curator David Kaplan sees the show as a doorway into the sensibility of a season in which Tennessee Williams plays will be paired thematically with Shakespeare plays. It is, Kaplan says, “a head-turning play in which Williams sets out strategies for survival, simultaneously poignant and ridiculous.”

About the Play:

Published in 1965, The Gnädiges Fräulein (pronounced “ga-NEH-de-gus FRAH-line”) was first produced as one of two plays under the title Slapstick Tragedy, alongside The Mutilated (produced by the Festival in 2013).

The play depicts the inhabitants of a rooming house in a place called Cocaloony Key. The titular character — now grown old, but still known as the “gracious young woman” — must support herself by competing for fish with the mythical cocaloony birds that hover threateningly overhead.

In the opening stage directions for The Gnädiges Fräulein, Williams describes the set as “a totally unrealistic arrangement … I mean like Picasso designed it.” It only gets stranger from there. As Williams wrote in his preface to the play for Esquire: “The style of the play is kin to vaudeville, burlesque and slapstick, with a dash of pop art thrown in.” 

The style and tone of The Gnädiges Fräulein departs from the poetic realism of earlier Williams plays. Williams has described the style of his plays from the 1960s onwards as “less naturalistic” and part of a new theater “where everything is very free and different.” In 1975, Williams commented that “I’m quite through with the kind of play that established my early and popular reputation. I’m doing a different thing, which is altogether my own.” 

About the Production:

The Gnädiges Fräulein marks the second co-production between the Festival and TTU following last September’s successful production of the Williams play Kirche, Küche, Kinder (An Outrage for the Stage), which the visiting New York Times reviewed as “superb” and “entrancingly bizarre.”

The Gnädiges Fräulein will feature performers Rachel Hirshorn and Randall Rapstine, both of whom appeared in Kirche, Küche, Kinder, as well as South African actress Anthea Thompson, last seen at the Festival in Kingdom of Earth in 2012 and 2013.

The play, Hall-Flavin says, is “a refracted view on Key West as a metaphor. While the subject matter of delicate souls trapped in a cruel world is at the core of so many of Williams’ plays, he was blending forms at this point in his career. So, you’ll find the pathos of tragedy as well as farcical comic moments, all rolled into an absurdist drama.”

“I am decidedly outside my comfort zone, and thrilled to be there,” says Hall-Flavin, who will travel to Lubbock, TX to rehearse the show in June. “All Williams plays are poetic and nonrealistic in certain ways, but this one seems more like something out of a surrealist painting than a poet’s notebook.” It is a nice fit, he adds, for a season that will explore “what happens to a writer later in life when they don’t feel constrained by form.”

A Growing Relationship with Texas Tech:

The Festival’s collaborative ties with TTU date back to the founding of the Festival 12 years ago. This growing relationship led Mark Charney, Director of the university’s Department of Theatre and Dance, to join with the Festival’s Literary Director Thomas Keith and Producing Director Charlene Donaghy in 2012 to develop and launch the Tennessee Williams Institute (TWI).

TWI is an immersive university-level symposium for graduate and doctorate level students offered in conjunction with the Festival. Several alumni of the TWI program, including Rapstine, will be involved in this year’s production of The Gnädiges Fräulein, as will Hirshorn, a faculty member at TTU who teaches Voice and Speech.

Charney sees such opportunities, borne of the TWI program, as central to the experiential education mission of TTU’s School of Theatre and Dance. “Not only do we have the pleasure of seeing all productions, meeting artists, and discussing our research with the best scholars in the business,” he says, “but we also are privileged to be among the select few collaborating on productions that break new ground and establish exciting contexts for Williams’ plays too often ignored.”

“The challenge is great,” Charney says, “but the fulfillment well worth it,” and credits the TWI team with “helping establish a connection that has grown in its influence and importance to our MFA and doctoral programs. I can’t imagine not attending the festival annually.”

Kaplan sees last year’s co-production with TTU, Kirche, Küche, Kinder, as “a completely successful show, which realized the weirdly discordant beauty of that piece.”

“Our hope with TWI,” Kaplan explains, “is that as students come out of that program, some will direct and some will design and some will lead programming. That’s exactly what is happening. The school is developing a collection of people with the sensibility to handle late Williams.”

"It takes time to develop that understanding,” Kaplan adds. “But these are the relationships that the Festival is here to cultivate.”

About the Provincetown Tennessee Williams Theater Festival:

The Provincetown Tennessee Williams Theater Festival was founded in 2006 in Provincetown — the birthplace of modern American theater — where Williams worked on many of his major plays during the 1940s. The TW Festival is the nation’s largest performing arts festival dedicated to celebrating and expanding an understanding of the full breadth of the work of America’s great playwright. Each year, theater artists from around the globe perform classic and innovative productions to celebrate Williams’ enduring influence in the 21st century, hosted by venues throughout the seaside village. For more details, visit twptown.org and follow the Festival on Facebook.

This Festival is funded in part by the Provincetown Tourism Fund, and is presented by Sage Inn & Lounge.

TW Institute 2017 Welcomes Special Guest Scholar Felicia Londré (3-8-17)

Download this Press Release (PDF)

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:                                        
Hunter Styles, Marketing Manager
(202) 306-5429 // hunter@twptown.org

 

PROVINCETOWN TENNESSEE WILLIAMS THEATER FESTIVAL
WELCOMES SPECIAL GUEST SCHOLAR FELICIA LONDRÉ
TO THE 2017 TENNESSEE WILLIAMS INSTITUTE

 

March 8, 2017 — (Provincetown, MA) The Provincetown Tennessee Williams Theater Festival is pleased to announce Felicia Hardison Londré, professor of theater at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, as the special guest scholar at the sixth annual Tennessee Williams Institute (TWI), an immersive University-level symposium offered during the Festival from Sept. 20-24, 2017.

Londré, who specializes in Shakespearean dramaturgy as well as 19th and 20th-century American, French, and Russian theater history, will provide a rich and valuable perspective for graduate student scholars enrolled in TWI. Londré will attend performances alongside students, as well as lead and participate in discussions of this year’s theme — Tennessee Williams and Shakespeare — in a workshop setting.

“We are thrilled to welcome Professor Felicia Londré to this year’s Institute,” says Festival Literary Director and TWI Coordinator Thomas Keith. “Her expertise as both a Shakespeare scholar and a Williams scholar is a perfect combination for our performance-based seminar. Felicia’s decades-long experience as a dramaturg and Shakespeare advisor in the professional theater make her an invaluable asset to the participants of TWI.”

This year's Festival will afford Londré the chance to study and discuss the intersections of Williams and Shakespeare plays in a week-long seminar environment. Londré says that she has not previously had the opportunity to do this, but anticipates some rich conversation. As poets and playwrights, Londré says, Williams and Shakespeare were “both very conscious of life's trajectories — ups and downs, success and failure, and getting old as time passes. They were both obsessed with these themes.”

In the intensely personal writing of Williams, tracking these themes is “complicated by the author’s tendency to revise his writing over long periods of time,” Londré explains in her essay “A Vast Traumatic Eye”: Culture Absorbed and Refigured in Tennessee Williams’s Transitional Plays, published in Brenda Murphy’s The Theatre of Tennessee Williams (2014).

Londré writes that Williams’ “perennial obsessions and concerns are seen developing throughout his work, from 1936 to 1983. Seen in this context, his recognizable tropes and themes take on a resonance and depth that it is impossible to see if one only looks at the great plays he wrote between 1944 and 1961.” These include “entrapment and escape … the plight of the artist, the bohemian, the romantic, and the misfit in contemporary America; the search for God, the gnawing of guilt, and the drive toward atonement; [and] the struggle with sexuality and gender identity.”

Londré adds that she visited Provincetown a decade ago, at which point she became aware of the Festival, which at the time was just beginning. Her visit in September will be a long-awaited opportunity to return to the seaside village for a week of theater and discussion. “What could be better than going to the theater every evening?" she says. "I would go to the theater three times a day, if I could. I'm insatiable!”

About Dr. Felicia Londré:

Londré is a theatre historian specializing in American, French, and Russian theatre, as well as a recognized Oxfordian scholar in the field of Shakespearean authorship. She has published over 60 scholarly articles, 25 journalistic publications, 100 book and theatre reviews, and 14 books. These include Tennessee Williams (1979), which Maurice Yacowar reviewed in the journal Modern Drama as “lively” and “effective because Professor Londré deals with small effects as well with the large themes. She prods us to respond to those fine details of staging that have always been important in Williams.” Londré has also published Tennessee Williams (1985) and Tennessee Williams: Life, Work, and Criticism (1989).

For 22 years (1978-2000), Londré was dramaturg and literary manager for the Missouri Repertory Theatre (now the Kansas City Repertory Theatre). She is an honorary co-founder of the Heart of America Shakespeare Festival, and she served as dramaturg for the Nebraska Shakespeare Festival from 1990 to 2009. She was the founding secretary of the Shakespeare Theatre Association of America, and has served as president of the American Theatre and Drama Society.

In 1998, Londré received a University of Montana Distinguished Alumna Award, having earned her B.A. in French there. She earned her M.A. at the University of Washington, and her Ph.D. at the University of Wisconsin. In 1999, she was inducted into the College of Fellows of the American Theatre at the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C.

In 2001, she was elected to the National Theatre Conference. That year she also received the Association for Theatre in Higher Education’s national award for 2001 as Outstanding Teacher of Theatre in Higher Education. Ten years later, she received the 2011 Betty Jean Jones Award for Outstanding Teacher of American Theatre and Drama.

Dr. Londré has held visiting professorships at Hosei University in Tokyo and at Marquette University in Milwaukee. She has lectured internationally, including Beijing, Nanjing, Tokyo, Osaka, Venice, Rouen, Caen, Paris (Sorbonne), Brussels, Moscow, and a lecture tour of Hungary.

About the Tennessee Williams Institute (TWI):
Now in its sixth year, TWI is an immersive University-level symposium for graduate and doctorate level students offered in conjunction with the Provincetown Tennessee Williams Theater Festival. Students attend a wide array of performances from across the globe, participate in private seminars with scholars, and interact with theater professionals.

TWI was initially developed by Thomas Keith, Williams editor and scholar, who is the Literary Director for the Festival, and Charlene Donaghy, the Festival’s Producing Director as well as a playwright and educator, in collaboration with Mark Charney, Director of Texas Tech University’s Department of Theatre and Dance.

Past TWI scholars have included:

  • Michael Paller, dramaturg and Director of Humanities for the American Conservatory Theatre in San Francisco
  • Annette Saddik, Professor of English and Theatre at New York City College of Technology
  • Tom Mitchell, Associate Head of the Department of Theatre at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • David Savran, Distinguished Professor of Theatre and the Vera Mowry Roberts Chair in American Theatre at The Graduate Center of the City University of New York

 Past TWI artist participants have included:

  • Lee Breuer,playwright, theater director, academic, educator, filmmaker, poet, lyricist, and a founding co-artistic director of Mabou Mines Theater Company in New York City
  • Maude Mitchell, Obie Award-winning actress, dramaturg, and producer
  • Laurie Sansom, former artistic director of National Theatre of Scotland
  • Fred Abrahamse and Marcel Meyer, co-founders of Abrahamse Meyer Productions in Cape Town, South Africa

About the Provincetown Tennessee Williams Theater Festival:

The Provincetown Tennessee Williams Theater Festival was founded in 2006 in Provincetown — the birthplace of modern American theater — where Williams worked on many of his major plays during the 1940s. The TW Festival is the nation’s largest performing arts festival dedicated to celebrating and expanding an understanding of the full breadth of the work of America’s great playwright. Each year, theater artists from around the globe perform classic and innovative productions to celebrate Williams’ enduring influence in the 21st century, hosted by venues throughout the seaside village. For more details, visit twptown.org and follow the Festival on Facebook.

This Festival is funded in part by Mass Humanities and Provincetown Tourism Fund, and is presented by Sage Inn & Lounge.

Announcing the 2017 Dinner and First Annual TENN Award (2-8-17)

Download this Press Release (PDF)

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:                                        
Hunter Styles, Marketing Manager
(202) 306-5429 // hunter@twptown.org

 

PROVINCETOWN TENNESSEE WILLIAMS THEATER FESTIVAL
CELEBRATES TENNESSEE WILLIAMS AND SHAKESPEARE
WITH JUNE CELEBRATION AND THE FIRST ANNUAL TENN AWARD

 

February 8, 2017 — (Provincetown, MA) The Provincetown Tennessee Williams Theater Festival announces today that its Annual Dinner will be held on Saturday, June 3, 2017. The gala will be held at Town Hall in Provincetown to support the organization’s 12th-annual Festival, which will celebrate Tennessee Williams and William Shakespeare when performances around the world come to Provincetown from Sept. 21-24, 2017.

Festival board members Deborah Bowles and James Mauro will co-chair the event. The 2017 Annual Dinner will inaugurate a new tradition by awarding the first-ever TENN Award to an individual, group, or organization that advances the spirit of Tennessee Williams through performance, public awareness, study, or publication.

The 2017 TENN Award will be announced this spring. Premium seats, general admission tickets, and table sponsorships for the Annual Dinner are available online and by phone at twptown.org or by calling 866-789-TENN.

Past guests of honor at the Annual Dinner have included award-winning stage and film actors Brian Dennehy (2016), Cherry Jones (2015), Zachary Quinto (2014), and Elizabeth Ashley (2013).

The 2017 Festival program will be announced in full at the Dinner. The line-up will include productions of Williams’ work paired with works by Shakespeare, as well as lighter “lagniappe” experiences similar to recent cabaret and late-night Festival events such as last year’s Movie Night and Saloon Songs.

This year’s theme builds off the success of last year’s festival, during which plays by Williams were paired with plays by Eugene O’Neill. The 2016 Festival audiences enjoyed making connections between the two playwrights — explored through performance, educational programming, and social events. 

In 2017, the experience of Tennessee Williams and Shakespeare side by side in performance will offer festival audiences a new understanding of both playwrights.

 “After both playwright/poets had mastered their craft,” says Festival Curator David Kaplan, “the countries where they lived experienced seismic political change. For Shakespeare, it was after the death of Queen Elizabeth; for Williams it was after the assassination of President Kennedy.”

Kaplan adds that “water recurs as an image of instability — tears, sweat, a fountain, the river Nile, and the Gulf of Mexico — in the plays of both writers, who assaulted their era’s conventional forms of tragedy or comedy, removing the certainty of a happy ending, and undoing the finality of tragedy with farce.”

Festival Executive Director Jef Hall-Flavin says: “Because we live on a narrow strip of sand, water plays an important role in the history and culture of Provincetown. We are excited to announce a season of great plays that celebrate the shimmering mystery and buoyancy surrounding us. This year’s gala will be a night to remember, with our first recipient of the TENN Award, surrounded by the friends and supporters who’ve kept this Festival sailing for the past 11 years.”

About the Provincetown Tennessee Williams Theater Festival:

The Provincetown Tennessee Williams Theater Festival was founded in 2006 in Provincetown — the birthplace of modern American theater — where Williams worked on many of his major plays during the 1940s. The TW Festival is the nation’s largest performing arts festival dedicated to celebrating and expanding an understanding of the full breadth of the work of America’s great playwright. Each year, theater artists from around the globe perform classic and innovative productions to celebrate Williams’ enduring influence in the 21st century, hosted by venues throughout the seaside village. For more details, visit twptown.org and follow the Festival on Facebook.

This Festival is funded in part by the Provincetown Tourism Fund, and is presented by Sage Inn & Lounge.

Past Press Releases

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